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Graduate Peers' Schedules

Spring 2015
Peer Advisor Availability

Professional Development Peer, Shawn Warner-Garcia
Monday: 10 a.m. to noon
Wednesday: 10 a.m. to noon
Friday: 10 a.m. to noon

Funding Peer, Kyle Crocco
Tuesday: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Thursday: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Writing Peer, Ryan Dippre
Monday: 1:30 to 4 p.m.
Tuesday: 9 to 11 a.m., 1:30 to 4:30 p.m.
Wednesday: 1:30 to 4 p.m.

Communications Peer, Melissa Rapp
Monday: 1 to 5 p.m.
Thursday: 2 to 4 p.m.

The peers sometimes hold events or attend meetings during their regular office hours. To assure you connect with your Graduate Peer Advisor, we encourage you to contact them by email and make an appointment.

Career

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Entries in career (27)

Tuesday
May192015

For Your Non-Academic Career, Do You Know Your Holland Code?

Are you considering a career outside of academia, but are not sure what jobs you are suited for? Then you might want to figure out your Holland Code, a three letter code based on six RIASEC categories: Realistic, Investigative, Artistic, Social, Enterprising, and Conventional.

For example, you might be an easygoing ARS (Artistic, Realistic, Social) or maybe cold as ICE (Investigative, Conventional, Enterprising). You can see what each category means in the chart (below).

The assessment, also known as the Strong Interest Inventory or Holland Occupational Themes, shows your personality type and can help your define your career choices outside of academia.

To figure out your Holland Code, you can take the Strong Interest Inventory assessment offered by Career Services. It takes about 30 minutes to do online and costs only $20 for UCSB students, which includes a counseling session to interpret your results. For a free assessment, try this test online here.

To get an idea of careers based on a single individual code, check out this list from Career Services.

Holland Codes and their meanings. Image courtesy of Career Services

Friday
Mar062015

Mastering the Elevator Speech

Credit: Marco WesselThe term “elevator speech,” one of the biggest buzzwords in career development these days, supposedly originated in a book by an English quality management expert in the early 1980’s called “The Art of Getting Your Own Sweet Way.” It refers to a pre-prepared, comprehensive set of ideas presented to an influential person in the time span of a standard elevator ride, that ideally produces some sort of positive action.

Though often used in the context of promoting business ideas (think reality TV show “Shark Tank”), with the high level of competitiveness in the job market in recent years and the subsequent emphasis on the power of networking, the term has found its way into the vocabulary of career development. In this case, individuals are not pitching a product or idea, but themselves. That is, within a short period of time, summarizing who they are and what they are looking for, as well as what they have to offer and why they are a good fit for the person they are in the “elevator” with.

It can be a tall order, including knowing what to say, when to say it, and for how long. But given the proven effectiveness of networking, with estimates that over 80% of jobs are gotten either directly or indirectly through connections, the “elevator speech” has become a key element of the process, and thus important to the repertoire of graduate students, whether exploring, pursuing, or enhancing their academic or non-academic careers.

Here is some guidance for your elevator speech:

What to say. There is no exact way to create an elevator pitch, and it certainly should vary depending on the context in which you employ it, but there are important main elements. The three key aspects in the employment search process are:

  1. Area of interest
  2. Ability to succeed in this area (education, experience, skills, strengths)
  3. “Fit” for targeted employers

Your speech, then, should ideally touch on these three areas in a way that is personally unique and differentiating. For example:

I’m completing the last year of my Ph.D. program in Developmental Psychology at UCSB. In addition to my research on increasing cultural diversity in after-school programs, I’ve spent the past two years working as a Program Evaluator for the A.S. Education Group in Santa Barbara, analyzing content, programming and accessibility of after-school programs. And during my masters program I was a Project Coordinator for Project Help in Los Angeles, overseeing the development of school-based programming for urban adolescents. I came to UCSB thinking that I wanted to pursue a career in academia, but after getting this great experience and discovering a kind of unique ability to integrate complex theories with front-line needs, I have decided that my interests and skill-set are a much better fit for leading programs. I’m excited to get to talk to you, as I’ve followed your program the past few years and feel that the work you do with adolescent education and development is very much in line with my strengths and career aspirations.

Credit: Hirotomo TLength. Thirty to 60 seconds, depending on circumstance.

Where to use. The elevator speech is utilized at a variety of networking, job search, and professional development events and opportunities, both in person and online. For instance:

  • Formal networking functions and events
  • Other professional development-oriented functions and events
  • Career fairs and employer information sessions
  • Informational interviews
  • “Professional” social media and other online correspondence
  • Casual encounters (sometimes even on elevators)
  • In the interview, answering the questions “tell me about yourself” and “why are you interested in this position?  (Note: answers in this context will normally be longer than 30-60 seconds).

When to employ. There is no simple strategy in regards to the appropriate time to whip out your elevator speech. The phrase “you’ll know it when you see it” comes to mind as sound advice. In more formal job search- and networking-oriented settings, it is generally expected that attendees will be assertive in selling themselves and are indeed often prompted to do so with a statement like, “Tell me about yourself” or the question, “What are you looking for?”

In other circumstances, the prompts are not so clear. The best guidance in these situations includes:

  • First ask questions and genuinely listen to the person you are talking to, ideally focusing on professional or career related topics.
  • Look for an appropriate time to share.
  • Don’t just jump into your elevator speech if not prompted.
  • It may be more effective to integrate the elements of your speech into a longer conversation.

Other Tips.

  • Prepare! Write, edit, practice, and get feedback.
  • Convey your uniqueness – what differentiates you, causes you to stand out.
  • Share what you’re passionate about and looking forward to doing.
  • Make it sound human and real, and don’t be afraid to smile.
  • Prepare a few variations for different circumstances.
  • Don’t brag! There’s a difference between emphasizing your accomplishments and attributes and bragging about them.

For more information about networking strategies, check out the slides from John Coate's March 4 networking workshop. UCSB Career Services offers an effective array of resources, programming, coaching, and other services. For more details, visit the Career Services website.

John Coate is the Assistant Director and Coordinator of Graduate Student Services for UCSB's Career Services. He periodically writes post on career and professional development issues for The GradPost.

Tuesday
Jan272015

The Trials and Tribulations of the Campus Visit

If you're on the job market this season, then the time is getting ripe (or already has gotten ripe) to start fielding invitations for campus visits. The advice for campus visits currently available online suggests that the experience of a campus visit is something akin to sprinting a marathon: an exhilarating, but exhausting event. 

While there is a great deal of practical advice for campus visitees out there, a recent article in the Chronicle of Higher Ed is particularly effective in tackling the 7 Hazards of the Campus Visit. Nancy Scott Hanway, the author of the piece, addresses the legitimate concerns of many graduate students, including being asked inappropriate questions, handling odd or random comments, and being offered alcohol. Hanway also provides a short quiz at the end of the article, which lets you put her advice into action. It's worth a read if you are gearing up for campus visits.

Tuesday
Dec022014

UC Humanities Research Institute to Host Graduate Career Workshop in San Diego

The UC Humanities Research Institute and the UC Humanities Network invite graduate students to attend a statewide career workshop to be held in San Diego on Friday, February 20, 2015. The day-long, hands-on workshop will include:

  • Stories from the Field: A roundtable of recent UC Ph.D.s employed in careers alongside/beyond the academy
  • Two-part workshop on informational interviews and career trajectories for Humanities Ph.D.s led by Dr. Debra Behrens, Career Counselor at UC Berkeley
  • Hands-on workshop with The Resume Studio
  • Theorizing Our Moment: A panel conversation about work and graduate student experiences

The UC Humanities Network is pleased to provide travel and lodging grants for up to three students from each UC campus to attend the event. To register for or learn more about the conference and to apply for a travel grant, click here. Travel grant applications are due January 19, 2015.

Wednesday
Jul302014

UCSB’s Graduate Division Seeks Student Input on Schedule for Fall Dissertation Writer’s Room

Credit: www.keepcalm-o-matic.co.uk

This summer, the Graduate Division has hosted a Dissertation Writer’s Room, a quiet workspace for UCSB’s graduate students to work on their dissertations. Strong student turnout thus far indicates the need and value of this resource, so we plan to continue it during the fall quarter.

If you are a UCSB graduate student, please take a moment and complete this brief survey. Your responses will help us to plan a schedule that works best for you.

For more details on the Dissertation Writer's Room, visit this announcement. For a look at this space, visit this link.

If you have any questions about the Dissertation Writer's Room, or other career and professional development resources, please email Robert Hamm.

Thursday
Apr242014

One-Year Lecturer Position Opening at Teachers College, Columbia University

The programs in TESOL and Applied Linguistics at Teachers College, Columbia University, are seeking a Lecturer with demonstrated teaching experience and research interests in one or more of the following areas: second language acquisition (SLA), second language pedagogy, and pedagogical grammar. This one-year position is renewable, subject to performance review and program needs, but does not lead to tenure.

Responsibilities:

  • Teach courses in the following areas: SLA, teaching practicum, or pedagogical English grammar
  • Teach five courses per academic year
  • May need to teach one course during a summer session for extra pay
  • Advise M.A. students
  • Serve on dissertation committees
  • Participate in routine program administrative activities
  • Build or maintain an active research and professional profile in TESOL and Applied Linguistics

Qualifications:

  • Earned doctorate in TESOL, Applied Linguistics, SLA, or a closely related field
  • Evidence of scholarship potential in one of these three areas: TESOL, Applied Linguistics, or SLA
  • A record of successful ESL and/or EFL teaching experience
  • A record of graduate level teaching
  • Emerging evidence of service to the field of TESOL or Applied Linguistics
  • Ability to perform administrative duties and to work collaboratively

To apply:

  1. Cover letter (detailing how you meet the qualifications for the position)
  2. A teaching philosophy
  3. CV
  4. Three letters of reference e-mailed directly by the referees to Dr. Han at:  tesolsearch@tc.columbia.edu (subject line: "TESOL/AL Lecturer Position 2014”)

Submit application materials at the following link on the TC Employment website:

https://careers.tc.columbia.edu/applicants/Central?quickFind=54657

Correspondence should be addressed to:

Professor ZhaoHong Han
Search Committee Chair
The Applied Linguistics and TESOL Program, Box 66
Teachers College, Columbia University
525 West 120th Street
New York, NY 10027-6061 USA

Wednesday
Apr162014

Two Great Teaching Job Opportunities in Northern California

credit: international rescue committee

Looking to teach in Northern California? Consider these job opportunities:

English as a Second Language (ESL) Instructor position: International Rescue Committee (IRC), San Jose, CA office

International Rescue Committee (IRC)
is looking for someone with experience to teach ESL classes to adult refugees who are preparing for employment in the United States. The ESL Instructor will teach and create lessons focusing on vocational English. This is a full-time position in San Jose, CA.

Here are some basic requirements:

  • Bachelor’s Degree in Adult Education or related field
  • ESL certification, such as TOSEL, TEFL or CELTA required
  • At least two years experience in ESL instruction or Adult Education
  • Must have a valid driver’s license, active insurance policy, and access to reliable transportation

For more information, visit http://ch.tbe.taleo.net/CH02/ats/careers/requisition.jsp?org=IRC&cws=1&rid=10442

 

credit: York schoolSpanish Language Teaching Position: York School, Monterey, CA

York School, a college preparatory, co-educational independent day school for grades 8-12, is currently looking for a full-time Spanish language teacher. Successful candidates will demonstrate the following:

  • Minimum of Bachelor’s Degree in Spanish
  • Ability to engage students to converse in Spanish in and out of class
  • Excellent writing skills both in English and Spanish.
  • Ability to communicate effectively with students and parents
  • Ability to collaborate with colleagues
  • Ability to sponsor a significant activity
  • Comfort with the independent school setting and involvement
  • Understand and exhibit high standards of professional conduct
  • Warmth, sense of humor, and tact
  • Experience and willingness to use technology in the classroom preferred

For more information, visit http://www.york.org/storage/Spanish%2014-15.pdf

Feel free to email me if you have any questions or need mentoring in applying to these jobs (Hala Sun, Diversity and Outreach Peer Advisor, hsun@graddiv.ucsb.edu)

Monday
Mar312014

How to Tell Your Advisor that Faculty Life Is Not for You

AdvisorCredit: Funding PeerMany graduate students have anxiety telling their advisors about their desire not to follow the sweet faculty life. Based on what I've seen and experienced at UCSB, graduate advisors think their students want to be just like them.

So how do you break your advisor's heart – and still get that reference or permission to do an internship out of the department? The following is my personal advice on how to handle the situation.

Prepare for the conversation

First, frame your conversation to stress the difficult job market for academia and that you want to be prepared for the possibility of not landing that sweet tenure-track job in Nowheresville, USA.

Next, do research on what options are available to you in your field of study.

Then, have a plan of what you are going to say and what research you have done.

Address push/pull factors

Let your advisor know what is pushing you away from academia and what is pulling you toward another field.

Push factors can include things such as the difficult job market in academia, your mounting financial obligations, and your geographical limitations.

Pull factors can include how you feel you can make a better, more meaningful contribution to a non-academic field such as government, non-profit, industry, or administration.

Ask for something specific

Be polite and explain to your advisor what you exactly need from him or her, in terms of a letter of reference or  permission to work in a non-academic internship.

Prepare a cheat sheet to show how the advisor can write your non-academic reference to best present your skills.

If things go wrong

Most advisors will be helpful, but if you feel your advisor is being unreasonable, you always have recourse to your department chair or the Graduate Division.

For more information on this topic, read The Chronicle of Higher Education advice article by L. Maren Wood, "How to Tell Your Advisor."

Thursday
Mar132014

Versatile PhD Online Panel Discussion: 'Careers in Social Media' 

Interested in learning more about how to turn an interest in social media into a career? All this week (March 10-14), Versatile PhD will host an online panel discussion with several humanities and social science PhDs and/or ABDs who have become social media professionals.

As a UCSB graduate student, you have free access to the information and resources on Versatile PhD. To learn more about accessing its premium content, such as the panel discussions, follow these simple instructions provided by Graduate Division.

To participate in the panel discussion on "Careers in Social Media," register on Versatile PhD, then visit the Humanities Forum anytime this week and search for threads beginning with the keyword "Panel." The expert panelists will answer questions throughout the week. If you prefer, you can receive posts by email: Log in, got to "MyVPhD, and then select "Notifications."

Sunday
Mar022014

Survey Shows Strapped Scientists Abandoning Research and Students

Credit: Funding PeerBad funding news for future and current graduate students pursuing science and engineering research.

In a Chronicle of Higher Education survey of over 11,000 scientists who had received grant funding from either the National Institutes of Health (NIH) or the National Science Foundation (NSF), due to lack of funding more than half of the respondents had abandoned an area of investigation central to their lab's mission and more than three-quarters had reduced their recruitment of graduate students and research fellows.

In the article, "Strapped Scientists Abandon Research and Students," Paul Basken and Paul Voosen report that based on the Chronicle survey "for better or worse, the nation’s scientists have embarked on an unequivocal downsizing of their capability to perform basic investigative research."

It's not only research and students that are affected, but full-time research positions have been reduced as well. According to the National Science Board (the NSF’s governing authority), fewer than 75 percent of people holding science and engineering doctorate degrees are being employed in academia in full-time faculty positions. This is down from 90 percent in the 1970s.

However, there is hope. Michael S. Teitelbaum, in his new book "Falling Behind? Boom, Bust, and the Global Race for Scientific Talent," argues that the current downturn in science funding is merely the fifth alarm-boom-bust cycle since the late 1940s. Such downturns eventually lead to fears of shortages, which lead to interventions in the forms of money and visas, which is later followed by another bust as interest wanes.

For more on the survey and how reduced funding is affecting research, read Basken and Voosen's full article.